How to Renew a Green Card

How to Renew a Green Card

A green card is the documentation granted to lawful permanent residents by the USCIS.



Overview

A green card is the documentation granted to lawful permanent residents (LPR) by the USCIS which demonstrates that the holder is authorized to legally work and live in the United States. Green cards generally expire after 10 years. If the green card expires, it must be renewed for the holder to continue to receive the benefits of lawful permanent residence.


Things to watch out for

Expiration dates: The expiration date on the green card will determine the time to file for renewal.


Helpful Tip

The expiration date is printed on the front of the green card and is easily found. 


Timelines to keep in mind

 

  • The type of green card dictates the timeline for renewal. Conditional permanent residents have different timelines for renewal than LPRs.
  • Instead of 10 years, conditional permanent residents have green cards that are only valid for 2 years. Conditional permanent residents should begin the renewal process 90 days before the green card expires.
  • LPRs have green cards that are valid for 10 years. LPRs should begin the renewal process 6 months before the green card expires.

 


Process for Renewal

When it’s time to renew the green card, the applicant must first file an application for renewal. This can be done online or by mail. The form for this process is Form I-90.


Replacing a green card

Sometimes green cards can be misplaced or stolen. In this case an application should be filed to replace the green card. The form for replacing a green card is the same form for renewing a green card, Form I-90. Replacing a green card should also be filed if it was issued to the LPR before the age of 14. Once the LPR reaches 14 years old, the LPR should file form I-90 for a new green card. However, if the LPR turns 16 years old before the green card expires, then the applicant does not need to file for a new green card upon reaching the age of 14.


Denials

Denials of green cards can occur. In this case a motion to reconsider the case or to reopen the case can be filed, which asks the USCIS to reconsider the denial. This process can be complicated but is an effective way to deal with a renewal denial.

A green card is the LPR’s proof that the LPR is legally authorized to work and live in the US. It’s important that the green card be renewed timely and kept current. Production of a current valid green card is the LPR’s proof of ability to live and work in the US on a permanent basis and receive other benefits given to permanent US residents. To discuss renewing a green card, filing a motion to reopen a green card case or any other issue surrounding green cards, contact the Law Office of Sweta Khandelwal. Attorney Khandelwal has 10 years experience as an immigration attorney and can assist with any green card issues.


Cited Sources

Renew A Green Card, March 30, 2015, USCIS

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